Columbus Involuntary Manslaughter Defense Lawyer

Columbus Involuntary Manslaughter Defense LawyerWere you recently arrested on suspicion of involuntary manslaughter in Columbus, Ohio?

You need to do everything in your power to make it tough for the prosecution to turn your charge into a conviction. You can start by getting in touch with a skilled Columbus involuntary manslaughter lawyer from Koenig & Owen, LLC.

Why Koenig & Owen, LLC, Should Be Your First Call After You’re Accused of Manslaughter in Columbus

man arrested for involuntary manslaughter in Columbus, OH.When the people of Columbus need a skilled criminal defense firm to help them fight back against accusations of vehicular homicide, drug trafficking, or aggravated murder, they know they can always rely on Koenig & Owen, LLC. Our team of Columbus criminal defense attorneys has the legal experience and statutory knowledge necessary to handle any case.

 

Should you ask us to defend you against your manslaughter charge, we will:

  • Work night and day to try to secure your bond
  • Conduct a thorough investigation into the state’s allegations
  • Walk you through your legal options
  • Prevent the prosecution from violating your rights
  • Provide you with sound legal advice on an as-needed basis
  • Put together an effective defense strategy on your behalf
  • Guide you through the complex Ohio legal system
  • Search for exculpatory evidentiary materials
  • Negotiate a plea bargain  with the prosecutor
  • Argue on your behalf in criminal court, if necessary

Would you like to have our Columbus homicide attorneys defend you against your involuntary manslaughter charge? If so, please contact us today to schedule a free consultation at our conveniently located law offices. We know how to win cases like yours and are more than ready to go to battle on your behalf.

Involuntary Manslaughter in the State of Ohio

Most legal jurisdictions in the United States define manslaughter as the illegal but unintentional killing of another individual. The state of Ohio divides offenses of this nature into two distinct categories:

  • Voluntary manslaughter, and
  • Involuntary manslaughter

Voluntary manslaughter (Ohio Revised Codes § 2903.03) happens if an individual takes the life of another person or their unborn child in a sudden fit of rage brought about by the victim’s actions. The state of Ohio almost always classifies this offense as a first-degree felony.

Involuntary manslaughter is very different. Per Ohio Revised Codes § 2903.04, an individual commits this offense when they kill another person or their unborn child as a result of their attempt to engage in a felony or misdemeanor.

In Ohio, involuntary manslaughter is a felony of the third degree if it occurs during the commission of a misdemeanor. However, when the crime happens during a felony offense, the state can upgrade it to a felony of the first degree.

A brief sampling of a few of the misdemeanor and felony crimes that most frequently cause deaths and involuntary manslaughter charges in the state of Ohio would include:

Did a law enforcement officer in Columbus, Ohio, recently arrest you on suspicion of involuntary manslaughter? Then please reach out to the team of knowledgeable criminal defense attorneys at Koenig & Owen, LLC, at your earliest convenience. We have many years of experience in the legal field and are ready to stand up for you.

Consequences of Involuntary Manslaughter Convictions in Ohio

When an Ohio court convicts someone of involuntary manslaughter, that person faces three distinct types of consequences:

  • Criminal consequences
  • Collateral consequences, and
  • Civil consequences

Each of these groups of consequences can have significant negative impacts on the offender’s life and prospects for the future.

Criminal Consequences of Involuntary Manslaughter Convictions

When the state of Ohio convicts a Columbus resident of involuntary manslaughter, it almost always sends them to prison and hands out a hefty fine. The exact nature of their criminal punishment depends on the seriousness of the underlying offense.

If the offender killed someone while attempting to commit a felony, they are likely to face the standard penalties for felonies of the first degree:

  • Up to11 years in a state prison, and
  • A fine of up to $20,000

However, if the convict caused a death while attempting to commit a misdemeanor offense, they will face the penalties for felonies of the third degree:

  • Up to five years in state prison, and
  • A fine of up to $10,000

In Ohio, as in most jurisdictions, first-time offenders tend to receive much lighter sentences than convicts with lengthy criminal records.

Collateral Consequences of Involuntary Manslaughter Convictions

In handing out sentences for involuntary manslaughter, the state of Ohio doesn’t stop at fines and imprisonment. It also gives offenders permanent criminal records.

As a result of these records, convicts are quite likely to experience a range of negative collateral consequences, such as:

  • Loss of Privacy: Convicted criminals have very little privacy. Their friends, family, and work colleagues can easily look up their records online.
  • Difficulty Finding Housing: Many Columbus landlords will not rent their properties to convicted criminals.
  • Immigration Challenges: When non-citizen felons get out of prison, the federal government frequently deports them.
  • Loss of Gun Ownership Rights: Ohio law forbids convicted felons from buying, using, and carrying guns.
  • Trouble Landing a Job: It is not at all unusual for businesses in Columbus to have policies against hiring criminals.
  • Professional Licensing Issues: Felons frequently lose their professional licenses after their conviction.
  • Challenges Getting Student Loans: The federal government makes it incredibly challenging for felons to obtain student loans.

Most offenders need to deal with these consequences for the rest of their lives. Usually, the only way to put an end to them is to convince a judge to overturn their conviction on appeal.

Civil Consequences of Involuntary Manslaughter Convictions

When courts in Ohio convict residents of involuntary manslaughter, it becomes much easier for the family members of the decedent to file a wrongful death suit against them.

In taking legal action of this nature, grieving loved ones can typically recover compensation for:

  • Medical bills
  • Lost income
  • Funeral costs
  • Mental anguish
  • Loss of consortium
  • Loss of inheritance

Do you need a knowledgeable Columbus criminal defense lawyer to help you fight to avoid the negative consequences of an involuntary manslaughter conviction? Then please reach out to Koenig & Owen, LLC, as soon as possible. Our legal team has been handling criminal cases like yours for years and is ready to go to bat on your behalf.

Defenses Against Ohio Involuntary Manslaughter Convictions

When arrested by the police, it is not at all uncommon for Columbus, OH, residents to think that the legal system will inevitably transform criminal charges into a conviction. In reality, however, arrestees can often get their charges dismissed or reduced with the assistance of an effective defense strategy.

A brief list of some of the strategies that our Ohio criminal defense attorneys use on a regular basis would include:

Lack of Evidence

To convict a person of involuntary manslaughter in the state of Ohio, prosecutors must prove their guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. If an attorney can successfully argue that the prosecution has not met its evidentiary burden, they may be able to convince the jury to render a verdict of not guilty.

Innocence

The most straightforward way for a defense attorney to persuade a judge or prosecutor to drop their client’s charge is to prove that they could not have committed the crime. To use this strategy, however, the legal team is likely to require plenty of relevant evidence, like:

  • Surveillance camera footage
  • GPS data
  • Electronic records
  • Witness testimony

If a lawyer can prove that their client was elsewhere or has an alibi for the time of the killing, they may be able to get their case thrown out fairly easily.

No Underlying Crime

For an individual to be guilty of involuntary manslaughter in the state of Ohio, they must kill someone during the commission of a felony or misdemeanor. If a legal team can show the court that their client did not commit an underlying crime, they might be able to get their case dismissed or have the prosecutor charge them with a lesser criminal offense.

Self-Defense

An attorney claiming that their client acted in self-defense is unlikely to convince a judge to dismiss their involuntary manslaughter charge – since the only reason their life would be in danger is because they were committing a crime. However, the self-defense strategy might prove to be successful if used in conjunction with one of the other approaches outlined above.

Our legal team has a detailed understanding of just about every area of Ohio criminal law. As such, we know which defense strategies are most likely to succeed in any given situation. If you want to have our attorneys examine your case and recommend the best path forward, please give us a call or contact us online today.

A Columbus Involuntary Manslaughter Lawyer You Can Count On

At Koenig & Owen, we have a long history of helping the residents of Columbus battle back against their criminal charges. Over the years, our legal team has defended clients against everything from robbery to vehicular manslaughter. So, if you need an experienced lawyer to assist you with your involuntary manslaughter case, please contact us as soon as possible.